Why Is There Foam in My Pee? Questions WIth Dr. B

“Since the demon, or demons, are invisible it is nearly impossible to detect them in your food.”

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Book Review: Be Cool by Ben Tanzer

“Tanzer aspires to the coolness that comes with trying but making it seem like you’re not trying, which is exactly how good writing is, and one of the reasons that Be Cool feels so effortless to read.”

Chillin’ With Characters

“There are plenty of zines and lit sites that give authors a platform to talk about their favorite seltzer water and convince everyone they use a typewriter, which is great and all, but that’s not what this is.”

Author Alexander Boldizar Interviewed by Christoph Paul

One of the earliest reviews I received said, “A full on satire of contemporary law as mesmerizing and complex as something lost from David Foster Wallace, yet as light in tone as A Confederacy of Dunces.” First I was flattered, thrilled, and then I thought, wait, didn’t both those guys kill themselves?

THE HOMESICK MINIVAN

“We loved Kerouac’s Mexico City Blues and Enzo wanted to read the whole book out loud. It took a long time because we got very drunk.”

The Christmas Poop of Catalan

“Whether you think Christmas is shit or Christmas is the shit, when you are Catalan, your Christmas is going to be full of shit. And I mean literally. And no, it doesn’t get that dirty (usually).”

BEAST

“Every night he asks me the same question. “Will you sleep with me?”

Video Inferno

“The cameraman wore a black suit with white gloves and a shiny red shirt. A large, handheld video camera obscured his face. The lens pointed right at me.”

Wu-Tang Tribute Anthology Submissions Open

“We want 2,000 to 3,000 word stories dealing with anything Wu-Tang Clan related. That could be Gravediggaz themes of horror, cool ass ninja shit, grimy Shaolin monks, slick futuristic science fiction a la Bobby Digital, gritty, or off-the wall crime fiction.”

Pride And Prejudice And Feminism

“Feminism fights for women’s independence to be their own person rather than being defined by their dependence on their husbands. In Austen’s time which was during the 1800s, women were stripped of any independence and were expected to be meek and submissive.”